Archive

Archive for December 17th, 2014

Pierce

December 17th, 2014 Comments off

Pierce Dec.14My thoughts and prayers were with Pierce as I drew his sweet likeness. I hope he feels much better after having his tonsils and adenoids removed, and that he has a very Merry Christmas!

Update:

His Mom, Jessica Thielemier, says his recovery is going a little rough , he’s run a fever and the medicine makes him sick, so let’s all say any extra prayer for Pierce tonight.

One of my favorite cards, worthy of a repost. By artist Cal Slayton, Jack’s father.

December 17th, 2014 Comments off

Jack is three years older now, but I just love this picture so I’m posting it again.

 Merry Christmas Jack.  You too Santa!

Mr. & Mrs. Cardinal

December 17th, 2014 Comments off

1383916_10152471515816992_356560207_n

Mating and Reproduction

By early spring, male cardinals have aggressively claimed their territories and will court and mate with a chosen female. Cardinals are predominately monogamous and will mate for life. The females build the shallow-cupped nest with some assistance from the male. Small twigs, strips of bark, grasses, and leaves gathered by both the male and female are woven together by the female and then lined with soft grasses and animal hair. Nest building takes between 3 and 9 days to complete. Prime nesting sites are dense bushes and shrubs.

The female lays between 3 and 4 eggs which she then incubates (with only occasional help from the male) for 12 to 13 days. The hatchlings are blind and featherless and must continue to be carefully incubated, also predominately by the female, for many more days. After the eggs hatch, the male enters into a period of manic food gathering and feeding. The nestlings initially must be fed 3 or 4 time each hour! This rate increases after the third day to up to 8 times per hour. As mentioned previously, most of the foods gathered for the nestlings are insects. By the fifth day the nestlings are large enough to swallow and digest larger food (like grubs etc) and so feeding frequencies (but not quantity!) can be reduced to 3 or 4 times per hour. The feeding behaviors displayed by the parents are so intense that cardinals have frequently been observed compulsively feeding other bird’s nestlings and even other willing species (including goldfish!).

source:http://www.psu.edu/dept/nkbiology/naturetrail/speciespages/cardinal.htm

We the Motivational Quotes Widget